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Christopher Cleveland

Christopher Cleveland on Chapter 9:

Perhaps the most ironic and satirical aspect of Voltaire’s Candide is his adherence to some of the societal trends of modern day we find so abhorrent. Voltaire makes no point to ridicule the Anti-Semitic or African views of his period. Specifically in this passage, Isaachar is vilified as a Jew and Voltaire even makes reference to the Biblical period of enslavement experienced by the Jews in Babylon. Casting Isaachar as “choleric” allows Candide to kill off the man in a manner similar to the death of the Inquisitor, but devoid of the humor surrounding the Catholic Church. Such aridity in prose will also be evident in the Old Woman’s descriptions of her rape by the Negro in a future chapter.

Although regarded as a progressive novel, Candide also allows the reader to examine how pervasively and strongly certain elements of society were driven into the manifestations of a man’s character.

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Christopher Cleveland on Chapter 7:

In agreement with Ms. Boone, Voltaire, in his dynamic writing offers many thoughts with this section.

Not only does Voltaire elevate Cunegonde through mystery and majesty, he elevates the position of the old woman. The old woman has strong control of the reunion of Cunegonde and Candide. She commands Candide to remove the veil of the woman, rather profound for the patriarchal society in which Voltaire lived. Also, Candide and Cunegonde are so immersed in their passions for each other that faint in a symbol of their immature passions. The old woman, practical and well-versed, quickly supplies smelling salts and even grows tired of the youth of the two lovers. The old woman’s actions speak to a lifetime of experience within a short section alluding to her long story of her life.

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  1. Ade1a (2)
  2. Alice Boone, Curator, Candide at 250: Scandal and Success (40)
  3. Amarish Mena (1)
  4. Amy Ward (4)
  5. Anonymous (1)
  6. Arjun Bassin (1)
  7. Armen Hakobyan (1)
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  10. Brette McSweeney (1)
  11. Chris Bruce (1)
  12. Chris Morrow (6)
  13. Christopher Cleveland (2)
  14. Connor Beeks (2)
  15. Connor Hillmann (1)
  16. Corri Schembri (4)
  17. Diana Encalada (2)
  18. Eric Palmer (1)
  19. Eric Palmer, Allegheny College, editor of the Broadview Editions 'Candide' (3)
  20. Erik Örjan Emilsson (6)
  21. Grace Kim (2)
  22. Iris Ramollari (5)
  23. Jack E. Chandler, MSE (1)
  24. Jacqueline Bennifield (4)
  25. Jacqueline Bueno (2)
  26. Jahneen B (1)
  27. James Basker, Richard Gilder Professor of Literary History, Barnard College (5)
  28. James Morrow, author The Last Witchfinder, The Philosopher's Apprentice (23)
  29. Jim Boone (2)
  30. Joe Haldeman (1)
  31. Jose Castro (2)
  32. Jose Lopez (2)
  33. Joseph Galluzzo (10)
  34. Justine Brown, author of Hollywood Utopia and All Possible Worlds (11)
  35. Kate (1)
  36. Kelle Dhein, PhD (1)
  37. Ken Houghton (1)
  38. lah (1)
  39. Leanna Caminero (1)
  40. Lucy Hunter (1)
  41. M. Beasley (1)
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  45. Matt C (2)
  46. Matt Pharris (2)
  47. Mgarcia2784 (1)
  48. Monika Mlynarska (3)
  49. Navrose Gill (2)
  50. Nicholas Cronk, Voltaire Foundation, Oxford (4)
  51. Nicholas Petrovich (1)
  52. Nicole Horejsi, Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University (11)
  53. Nile Southern (1)
  54. Raj Shah (2)
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  56. S McGhee (1)
  57. Samantha Morse (3)
  58. Samantha White, 12th Grade IB Student (2)
  59. Sean Murray, Intrigued Student (1)
  60. Shelley (1)
  61. Stanton Wood, playwright, Candide Americana (13)
  62. Tom Gilbert (5)
  63. Travis Lo (1)
  64. Trisha Amin (1)
  65. Victor Uszerowicz (1)
  66. Wataru Hoeltermann, Student at MDC (1)
  67. William Rodriguez (1)
  68. Zoraida Pastor (1)

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