Take a visual journey through Voltaire's Candide

 

 

Chapter XXX:
The Conclusion

Illustration by Rockwell Kent from: Voltaire. Candide. New York: Random House, 1928. NYPL, Rare Book Division. By Permission of the Plattsburgh State Art Museum, The Rockwell Kent Gallery & Collection.


Sublime Porte: a term referring to the government of the Ottoman Empire.

It is natural to imagine that after so many disasters Candide — married and living with the philosopher Pangloss, the philosopher Martin, the prudent Cacambo, and the Old Woman, having besides brought so many diamonds from the country of the ancient Incas — must have led a very happy life. But he was so much imposed upon by the Jews that he had nothing left except his small farm; his wife became uglier every day, more peevish and unsupportable; the Old Woman was infirm and even more fretful than Cunegonde. Cacambo, who worked in the garden, and took vegetables for sale to Constantinople, was fatigued with hard work, and cursed his destiny. Pangloss was in despair at not shining in some German university. For Martin, he was firmly persuaded that he would be as badly off elsewhere, and therefore bore things patiently. Candide, Martin, and Pangloss sometimes disputed about morals and metaphysics. They often saw passing under the windows of their farm boats full of effendis, pashas, and cadis, who were going into banishment to Lemnos, Mitylene, or Erzeroum. And they saw other cadis, pashas, and effendis coming to supply the place of the exiles, and afterwards exiled in their turn. They saw heads decently impaled for presentation to the Sublime Porte. Such spectacles as these increased the number of their dissertations.

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