Take a visual journey through Voltaire's Candide

 

 

Chapter XV:
How Candide Killed the Brother of His Dear Cunegonde

Illustration by Rockwell Kent from: Voltaire. Candide. New York: Random House, 1928. NYPL, Rare Book Division. By Permission of the Plattsburgh State Art Museum, The Rockwell Kent Gallery & Collection.


quarterings: indicating multiple coats of arms; i.e., Cunegonde, unlike Candide, is of a venerable and noble family.

"That is all I want," said Candide, "for I intended to marry Cunegonde, and I still hope to do so."

"You insolent!" replied the Baron. "Would you have the impudence to marry my sister who has seventy-two quarterings! I find thou hast the most consummate effrontery to dare to mention so presumptuous a design!"

"Reverend Father, all the quarterings in the world signify nothing; I rescued your sister from the arms of a Jew and of an Inquisitor; she has great obligations to me, she wishes to marry me; Master Pangloss always told me that all men are equal, and certainly I will marry her."

"We shall see about that, thou scoundrel!" said the Jesuit Baron de Thunder-ten-Tronckh, and that instant struck him across the face with the flat of his sword. Candide in an instant drew his rapier, and plunged it up to the hilt in the Jesuit's belly; but in pulling it out reeking hot, he burst into tears.
 

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